a seed to change

While watching squash develop from small starter plants (seen in the immediate foreground of the picture on the left) in my plot at a community garden, I’ve been continually reminded of change and growth on a daily basis.  Change happens as plants grow.  Likewise, change happens as people grow. I’ve also had the good fortune to witness change and growth on a community level. When people come together to support a unifying cause, community is born. Whether it be walking to raise funds for breast cancer, painting a yoga studio, or growing a cover crop to enhance soil in a community garden,  I’ve observed first hand the power in community, interdependence, interconnectedness and change.  For this, I am very grateful.   

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Community is beautifully elastic.  Change and growth within groups bends, swells, grows taller and wider.  Some gatherings of people supporting a cause will eventually, naturally die off like the squash plant after it gives its fruit or the ladies coming together for a morning to walk for breast cancer.  But, isn’t that the beauty of growth and change?  It morphs and wiggles never settling for too much time.  

Meditation helps and teaches the practitioner to embrace, soften around and get stronger with change, growth, interconnectedness and interdependence. Our perspectives or long held beliefs we’ve had about any of these topics may shift or be challenged in a positive way with a consistent meditation practice.  

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This apple oat crisp straight out of Martha Stewart Living mag is a Thanksgiving worthy dessert with the added benefit that no crust is involved.  The recipe below is MSL’s.  I changed it up a bit…an 8 x8 baking dish made the dessert a little thicker.  For the topping my changes were:  coconut oil, melted, instead of butter, coconut palm sugar for its earthiness rather than brown sugar, an increase of 1/4 c. of oats (which I ground) gave the resulting dish a little more topping, and a good sprinkling of cinnamon. For the filling I used only apples, raisins and another good sprinkling of cinnamon.  No sugar. Keep an eye on your dessert as it is baking. Mine took a full 15 minutes less to bake than the MSL recipe.  

In the baking mood and want another idea?  Check out Laura’s Sweet Potato Muffins.  

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Apple Oat Crisp

from Martha Stewart Living, November Issue

Topping 

  • 1 c. old -fashioned rolled oats
  • 1/4 c. light brown sugar
  • 1/8 t coarse salt
  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter, melted

Filling

  • 2 pounds sweet apples 
  • 1/4 c. light brown sugar 
  • 1/4 c. dried cherries
  • 1/4 t. ground cinnamon 
  1. Topping: Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Pulse 1/2 c. oats in a food processor until coarsely ground.  Transfer to a bowl and add remaining 1/2 c. oats, brown sugar, salt, and butter.  Stir until combined. 
  2. Filling: Toss together filling ingredients in a bowl and transfer to a 9 inch square baking dish.  Sprinkle with topping.  Cover with parchment lined foil and bake 30 minutes.  Remove foil and continue baking until apples are tender and topping is golden brown, about 30 minutes more.  Let cool slightly before serving. 

 

 

since when is dependency…good?

Dependency is good, when it is interdependence.  When we are connected by a need that two parties fulfill, such as in the relationship between farmer and consumer, interdependence can shine.  Whether is it the government buying surplus crop from a farmer or a woman purchasing corn from a produce stand to feed her family, consumer and farmer are dependent upon each other.  This links us together.  In this example, we are connected by a need for nourishment and sustenance. Interdependence is a link of unending dependence.

In the past several months, I’ve circled the idea of mutual dependency like a wolf circling its prey.  It was both intriguing and confusing to me.  It was intriguing because I didn’t actively embrace mutual reliances.  (Yes, this is foolish.)  It is not necessarily that I shun being dependent upon others, but my off-handed reaction was driven more by an uneducated indifference and a lack of awareness.  My confusion was driven by its application in some meditation traditions.

When I think of dependency, my mind immediately bounces as quickly as a tennis ball bounces off of a racquet to codependency.  Without skipping a beat, emotionally I begin to back away.  So, I had to put in the time to retrain my mind that dependency can be something that is to be welcomed.

Now, I understand the vibe of mutual reliance can be virtuous.  Going forward, I hope that I think more often of the farmer’s hands who planted all of the root vegetables in the soup my husband and I enjoy.  Hands stained black with dirt and hard work as I saw at a dinner I recently attended honoring food and cooking.  Or, I hope I remember that my favorite plant in the front yard was started by Rick in his nursery.  Had he not started the plant from seed, I would not be able to enjoy looking at it everyday.

So, when is dependency good?  It is good when a link of unending dependence answers mutual needs.  If you are interested in reading more about this topic, as a starting point I suggest visiting The Interdependence Project at theidproject.org.

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Parsnips and Beans

I keep coming back to this soup.  I’ve made it at least twice in the past week.  I’ve eaten it for dinner and lunch.  While it is not pretty or fancy, it is just the sort of thing I crave in a soup.  Tender, chunky vegetables that have retained a bit of bite.  A good dose of onion, lots of beans, a grain, and a little bit of seasoning to pull it all together.

Cook’s Notes:  *Vidalia green onions are typically found in markets the months of February, March, and early April.  They have a large white bulb and are the length of leeks. I love them and use them for the months they are available in place of sweet onions.  (If you cannot find them, simply substitute a sweet onion. I would not substitute the smaller, thinner green onion.)

Chunky Parsnip and Bean Soup

  • 2 lg. or 3 small carrots, rinsed, diced, (peel on)
  • 2 lg. or 3 small parsnips, rinsed, diced, (peel on)
  • 2 lg. *Vidalia spring onions with green tops, rinsed, slice thinly including the green tops
  • or 1 medium sweet onion
  • 1 to 2 t. ground thyme
  • 2 t. oregano
  • 2 – 3 T. tomato paste
  • 1 15 oz. can cannelini beans, rinsed, and drained
  • 1 15 oz. can pinto beans, rinsed, and drained
  • 4 + c. vegetable broth, preferably low-sodium and water as desired
  • 2 + c. cooked brown rice
  • salt to taste
  1. In a medium saucepan, cook 1 c. brown rice according to package directions.  Set aside.
  2. In a large stockpot or dutch oven, heat 1 – 2 T. extra virgin olive oil over medium heat.  Add the diced carrots and parsnips with a pinch of salt.  Cook the vegetables, stirring frequently as they begin to soften, about 8 or so minutes.  Add the onion and continue to cook over medium heat about another 8 minutes, reducing the heat if necessary.
  3. When the vegetables are fork tender and the onion has become translucent, push the veg to the side and add 2 or 3 T. of tomato paste.  Stir continuously as the paste loses its raw flavor, about 1 – 2 minutes.
  4. Add the spices.  Stir continuously about 1 – 2 minutes to bloom the spices.  Add 3 c. of broth, half of each dish of drained and rinsed beans, and half of the rice.  Stir to combine.  Now add the remaining broth, rice, and beans to your liking.  Substitute 1 c. water for broth, if desired.  (I ended up using about 2/3 of each can of beans, 2 1/2 c. of broth, 1c. of water, and 2 1/2 c. of the cooked rice.)  Simmer for 5 or so minutes until the flavors begin to come together.  Serve hot.  Dress each bowl of soup with a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, if desired.